Upcoming Seminars & Events

July 2018
Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
1
2
Dr. Fabai Wu

Bacterial chromosome organization

at 13:15

3 4 5
Dr. Géraldine Laloux

Unraveling the function of a stress sentinel in the bacterial envelope

at 13:15

6 7 8
9
Dr. Nassos Typas

High-throughput interaction profiling in bacteria

at 13:15

10 11 12 13 14 15
16
Prof. Dr. Alexandre Persat

Mechanosensing with type IV pili in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

at 13:15

Sanne Westhoff

Bacterial warfare: antibiotic production and resistance in co-existing Streptomycetes

at 14:15

17 18 19 20 21 22
23
Hanna Müller Esparza

Characterization of DNA interference by a minimal Type I CRISPR-Cas system

at 13:15

Francisco Diaz Pascual

Biofilm architectural breakdown in response to antibiotics facilitates community invasion

at 13:50

Tarryn Miller

Shedding Light on CETCH: Linking synthetic carbon fixation pathways to the energy produced by light powered thylakoids

at 14:40

Manuel Osorio Valeriano

A CTP-binding protein links the ParABS chromosome segregation system to the bactofilin cytoskeleton in Myxococcus xanthus

at 15:15

24 25 26
Karsten Zecher

Nitrogen recycling by Rhodobacteraceae as an important factor determining diatom's community composition in the oceans?

at 10:00

27 28 29
30
Prof. Dr. Tomasz Borowski

α-Ketoglutarate dependent dioxygenases - computational studies on reaction mechanisms

at 13:15

31

Upcoming Seminars

  • Prof. Dr. Alexandre Persat

    Mechanosensing with type IV pili in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Jul 16, 2018 13:15

    MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

  • Sanne Westhoff

    Bacterial warfare: antibiotic production and resistance in co-existing Streptomycetes

    Jul 16, 2018 14:15

    MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

  • Graduate Students Mini-Symposium III/2018

    Jul 23, 2018 13:15

    MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

  • Hanna Müller Esparza

    Characterization of DNA interference by a minimal Type I CRISPR-Cas system

    Jul 23, 2018 13:15

    MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

  • Francisco Diaz Pascual

    Biofilm architectural breakdown in response to antibiotics facilitates community invasion

    Jul 23, 2018 13:50

    MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

  • Tarryn Miller

    Shedding Light on CETCH: Linking synthetic carbon fixation pathways to the energy produced by light powered thylakoids

    Jul 23, 2018 14:40

    MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

News

The mission of the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology (MPIterMic) is to obtain an integrated understanding of how microorganisms function at the molecular, cellular, and community levels. Microorganisms are the oldest and by far the most abundant and diverse inhabitants of the Earth. Their evolutionary success is based largely on three characteristics: Their immense metabolic capacities, which surpass those of all other life forms, an ability to adapt to environmental changes, and their multitude of interactions with other organisms. The strategies they have developed enable them to proliferate in practically every ecological niche. By doing so, microorganisms play pivotal role in processes of fundamental importance including biomass conversion, biogeochemical cycles and photosynthesis, and they have major impacts on plant and animal physiology.
 
The overall goal of our research is to understand how microorganisms accomplish these tasks. To this end, groups at the MPIterMic cover research in microbiology at all scales from protein structure determination, physiology, metabolism, molecular & cellular microbiology to host-microbe interactions and microbial communities, applying a number of cutting-edge technologies combined with computational modeling and synthetic biology approaches.

Our mission

The mission of the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology (MPIterMic) is to obtain an integrated understanding of how microorganisms function at the molecular, cellular, and community levels. Microorganisms are the oldest and by far the most abundant and diverse inhabitants of the Earth. Their evolutionary success is based largely on three characteristics: Their immense metabolic capacities, which surpass those of all other life forms, an ability to adapt to environmental changes, and their multitude of interactions with other organisms. The strategies they have developed enable them to proliferate in practically every ecological niche. By doing so, microorganisms play pivotal role in processes of fundamental importance including biomass conversion, biogeochemical cycles and photosynthesis, and they have major impacts on plant and animal physiology.

 

The overall goal of our research is to understand how microorganisms accomplish these tasks. To this end, groups at the MPIterMic cover research in microbiology at all scales from protein structure determination, physiology, metabolism, molecular & cellular microbiology to host-microbe interactions and microbial communities, applying a number of cutting-edge technologies combined with computational modeling and synthetic biology approaches. [more]
 
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