Upcoming Seminars & Events

October 2018
Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
1 2 3 4
Mariana Schuster

Establishment of CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology for the study of effector families in the plant pathogen (PhD Defense)

at 16:00

5
Dr. Erh-Min Lai

A Time to Kill: Mechanisms and Biological Insights of T6SS-Mediated Bacterial Warfare

at 09:00

6 7
8
Prof. Dr. Miroslaw Cygler

Structural insights into effector kinases from pathogenic gram-negative bacteria

at 13:15

9 10 11 12 13 14
15
Prof. Dr. Tim Urich

Methylotrophic methanogens everywhere - ecology and physiology of novel players in global methane cycling

at 13:15

Prof. Dr. Gabriele Berg

The networking of microbiomes across plant generations

at 14:15

16
Dr. Yen-Ping Hsueh

Predator-prey interactions between the nematode-trapping fungi and nematodes

at 09:00

17 18 19 20 21
22
Dr. Peter Mergaert

Resistance to antimicrobial peptides is essential in symbiotic bacteria of plants and animals for chronic infection of their host

at 13:15

Dr. Stephan Kiontke

Structural and mechanistic insights into the guanine nucleotide exchange factor complex Mon1-Ccz1

at 14:15

23
Leanid Laganenka

Role of chemotaxis in autoaggregation of Escherichia coli (PhD Defense)

at 15:00

24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31

Upcoming Seminars

  • Dr. Peter Mergaert

    Resistance to antimicrobial peptides is essential in symbiotic bacteria of plants and animals for chronic infection of their host

    Oct 22, 2018 13:15

    MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

  • Dr. Stephan Kiontke

    Structural and mechanistic insights into the guanine nucleotide exchange factor complex Mon1-Ccz1

    Oct 22, 2018 14:15

    MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

  • Leanid Laganenka

    Role of chemotaxis in autoaggregation of Escherichia coli (PhD Defense)

    Oct 23, 2018 15:00

    MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

  • Prof. Dr. Harold Drake

    To be announced

    Nov 5, 2018 13:15

    MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

  • Dr. Günther Kramer

    To be announced

    Nov 12, 2018 13:15

    MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

  • Prof. Dr. Benjamin Horwitz

    ChAP1, a transducer of oxidant and small-molecule signals in the maize pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus

    Nov 12, 2018 14:15

    MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

News

The mission of the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology (MPIterMic) is to obtain an integrated understanding of how microorganisms function at the molecular, cellular, and community levels. Microorganisms are the oldest and by far the most abundant and diverse inhabitants of the Earth. Their evolutionary success is based largely on three characteristics: Their immense metabolic capacities, which surpass those of all other life forms, an ability to adapt to environmental changes, and their multitude of interactions with other organisms. The strategies they have developed enable them to proliferate in practically every ecological niche. By doing so, microorganisms play pivotal role in processes of fundamental importance including biomass conversion, biogeochemical cycles and photosynthesis, and they have major impacts on plant and animal physiology.
 
The overall goal of our research is to understand how microorganisms accomplish these tasks. To this end, groups at the MPIterMic cover research in microbiology at all scales from protein structure determination, physiology, metabolism, molecular & cellular microbiology to host-microbe interactions and microbial communities, applying a number of cutting-edge technologies combined with computational modeling and synthetic biology approaches.

Our mission

The mission of the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology (MPIterMic) is to obtain an integrated understanding of how microorganisms function at the molecular, cellular, and community levels. Microorganisms are the oldest and by far the most abundant and diverse inhabitants of the Earth. Their evolutionary success is based largely on three characteristics: Their immense metabolic capacities, which surpass those of all other life forms, an ability to adapt to environmental changes, and their multitude of interactions with other organisms. The strategies they have developed enable them to proliferate in practically every ecological niche. By doing so, microorganisms play pivotal role in processes of fundamental importance including biomass conversion, biogeochemical cycles and photosynthesis, and they have major impacts on plant and animal physiology.

 

The overall goal of our research is to understand how microorganisms accomplish these tasks. To this end, groups at the MPIterMic cover research in microbiology at all scales from protein structure determination, physiology, metabolism, molecular & cellular microbiology to host-microbe interactions and microbial communities, applying a number of cutting-edge technologies combined with computational modeling and synthetic biology approaches. [more]
 
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