Upcoming Seminars & Events

February 2018
Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
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5
Gangfeng Huang

Studies on catalytic mechanism of [Fe]-hydrogenase from methanogenic archaea

at 13:15

Carolina Duarte de Freitas

Architecture of Vibrio parahaemolyticus swarm-colonies

at 13:50

Shankar Iyer Chandrashekar

Characterization of a Serine/Threonine kinase in Vibrio parahaemolyticus

at 14:25

6
Prof. Dr. Antonio Lagares

Meta-phenomic studies in a model plant-associated bacterium: Specificity traits consistent with legume-rhizobia coevolution are expressed during the early rhizosphere colonization

at 14:00

7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19
Dr. Hailing Jin

Cross-Kingdom RNAi and small RNA trafficking between plants and fungal pathogens

at 09:00

Dr. Tung Le

Divorcing chromosomes still need rings: the role of an ancestral SMC protein in bacterial chromosome organisation and segregation

at 13:15

20
Wanyang Wang

The bacterial gut microbiota of wood- and humus-feeding termites: Diazotrophic populations and compartment-specific response of bacterial communities to environmental factors

at 16:00

21 22 23 24 25
26
Prof. Dr. Kirsten Küsel

Chemical interaction between iron-cycling microbes: news from the chat room

at 13:15

Prof. Dr. Marc Erhardt

Self-assembly of a bacterial nanomachine: Flagella grow through an injection-diffusion mechanism

at 14:15

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Upcoming Seminars

  • Dr. Hailing Jin

    Cross-Kingdom RNAi and small RNA trafficking between plants and fungal pathogens

    Feb 19, 2018 09:00

    MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Seminar Room III

  • Dr. Tung Le

    Divorcing chromosomes still need rings: the role of an ancestral SMC protein in bacterial chromosome organisation and segregation

    Feb 19, 2018 13:15

    MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

  • Wanyang Wang

    The bacterial gut microbiota of wood- and humus-feeding termites: Diazotrophic populations and compartment-specific response of bacterial communities to environmental factors

    Feb 20, 2018 16:00

    MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

  • Prof. Dr. Kirsten Küsel

    Chemical interaction between iron-cycling microbes: news from the chat room

    Feb 26, 2018 13:15

    MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

  • Prof. Dr. Marc Erhardt

    Self-assembly of a bacterial nanomachine: Flagella grow through an injection-diffusion mechanism

    Feb 26, 2018 14:15

    MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

  • Dr. Felipe Cava

    D-Amino acids shape the environmental microbial biodiversity

    Mar 5, 2018 13:15

    MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

News

The mission of the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Terrestrial Microbiology is to understand how microorganisms function at the molecular, cellular, and community levels.  In particular, we aim to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the metabolic diversity of microorganisms, their ability to adapt and differentiate in response to changes in the environment, the mechanisms involved in cell cycle regulation and cell polarity, as well as the biogeochemical processes involved in the exchange of climatically relevant trace gases. These analyses include all levels of microbial functions from the atomic/structural, molecular/cellular, and biochemical/physiological to the microbial community level as well as plant-microbe interactions.The research areas covered at the MPI include:
Cellular microbiology Molecular microbiology Microbial biochemistry Biogeochemistry Microbial ecology Environmental genomics Microbial symbiosis Fungal biodiversity  Pathogen evolution  Plant-microbe interactions Plant pathogens Synthetic biology  Systems biology

Our mission

The mission of the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Terrestrial Microbiology is to understand how microorganisms function at the molecular, cellular, and community levels.
In particular, we aim to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the metabolic diversity of microorganisms, their ability to adapt and differentiate in response to changes in the environment, the mechanisms involved in cell cycle regulation and cell polarity, as well as the biogeochemical processes involved in the exchange of climatically relevant trace gases.
These analyses include all levels of microbial functions from the atomic/structural, molecular/cellular, and biochemical/physiological to the microbial community level as well as plant-microbe interactions.


The research areas covered at the MPI include:
Cellular microbiology
Molecular microbiology
Microbial biochemistry
Biogeochemistry
Microbial ecology
Environmental genomics
Microbial symbiosis
Fungal biodiversity
Pathogen evolution
Plant-microbe interactions
Plant pathogens
Synthetic biology
Systems biology
[more]
 
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