Upcoming Seminars & Events

November 2018
Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
1
Oliver Schauer

Antigen 43-mediated biotin display and fabrication of bacteria-driven microswimmers (PhD Defense)

at 11:00

2 3 4
5
Prof. Dr. Harold Drake

Darwin’s invertebrates: A transient anoxic microbial oasis

at 13:15

6
Sabine Rosskopf

Regulation of peptidoglycan biosynthesis in Hyphomonas neptunium (PhD Defense)

at 11:00

7 8 9 10 11
12
Dr. Günther Kramer

Mechanisms of co-translational folding and assembly of proteins studied by ribosome profiling

at 13:15

Prof. Dr. Benjamin Horwitz

ChAP1, a transducer of oxidant and small-molecule signals in the maize pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus

at 14:15

13 14 15 16 17 18
19
Dr. Christoph Grangeasse

RocS drives chromosome segregation and nucleoid protection during cell division of Streptococcus pneumoniae

at 13:15

20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30

Upcoming Seminars

  • Dr. Günther Kramer

    Mechanisms of co-translational folding and assembly of proteins studied by ribosome profiling

    Nov 12, 2018 13:15

    MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

  • Prof. Dr. Benjamin Horwitz

    ChAP1, a transducer of oxidant and small-molecule signals in the maize pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus

    Nov 12, 2018 14:15

    MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

  • Dr. Christoph Grangeasse

    RocS drives chromosome segregation and nucleoid protection during cell division of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Nov 19, 2018 13:15

    MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

  • Dr. Sophie Helaine

    Salmonella persisters during infection

    Dec 10, 2018 00:00

    MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

  • Prof. Dr. Elias-Arnanz Montserrat

    A new facet of vitamin B12: gene regulation by a novel and widespread family of adenosylcobalamin-dependent photoreceptors in bacteria

    Dec 10, 2018 13:15

    MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

  • Dr. Dieter Jendrossek

    To be announced

    Dec 17, 2018 13:15

    MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

News

The mission of the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology (MPIterMic) is to obtain an integrated understanding of how microorganisms function at the molecular, cellular, and community levels. Microorganisms are the oldest and by far the most abundant and diverse inhabitants of the Earth. Their evolutionary success is based largely on three characteristics: Their immense metabolic capacities, which surpass those of all other life forms, an ability to adapt to environmental changes, and their multitude of interactions with other organisms. The strategies they have developed enable them to proliferate in practically every ecological niche. By doing so, microorganisms play pivotal role in processes of fundamental importance including biomass conversion, biogeochemical cycles and photosynthesis, and they have major impacts on plant and animal physiology.
 
The overall goal of our research is to understand how microorganisms accomplish these tasks. To this end, groups at the MPIterMic cover research in microbiology at all scales from protein structure determination, physiology, metabolism, molecular & cellular microbiology to host-microbe interactions and microbial communities, applying a number of cutting-edge technologies combined with computational modeling and synthetic biology approaches.

Our mission

The mission of the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology (MPIterMic) is to obtain an integrated understanding of how microorganisms function at the molecular, cellular, and community levels. Microorganisms are the oldest and by far the most abundant and diverse inhabitants of the Earth. Their evolutionary success is based largely on three characteristics: Their immense metabolic capacities, which surpass those of all other life forms, an ability to adapt to environmental changes, and their multitude of interactions with other organisms. The strategies they have developed enable them to proliferate in practically every ecological niche. By doing so, microorganisms play pivotal role in processes of fundamental importance including biomass conversion, biogeochemical cycles and photosynthesis, and they have major impacts on plant and animal physiology.

 

The overall goal of our research is to understand how microorganisms accomplish these tasks. To this end, groups at the MPIterMic cover research in microbiology at all scales from protein structure determination, physiology, metabolism, molecular & cellular microbiology to host-microbe interactions and microbial communities, applying a number of cutting-edge technologies combined with computational modeling and synthetic biology approaches. [more]
 
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