Our mission

Our mission

The mission of the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology (MPIterMic) is to obtain an integrated understanding of how microorganisms function at the molecular, cellular, and community levels. Microorganisms are the oldest and by far the most abundant and diverse inhabitants of the Earth. Their evolutionary success is based largely on three characteristics: their immense metabolic capacities, which surpass those of all other life forms, an ability to adapt to environmental changes, and their multitude of interactions with other organisms. The strategies they have developed enable them to proliferate in practically every ecological niche. By doing so, microorganisms play pivotal role in processes of fundamental importance including biomass conversion, biogeochemical cycles and photosynthesis, and they have major impacts on plant and animal physiology.

The overall goal of our research is to understand how microorganisms accomplish these tasks. To this end, groups at the MPIterMic cover research in microbiology at all scales from protein structure determination, physiology, metabolism, molecular & cellular microbiology to host-microbe interactions and microbial communities, applying a number of cutting-edge technologies combined with computational modeling and synthetic biology approaches.

News

Corn smut has undergone a specialized evolution for virulence

December 04, 2018

Smut fungi are pathogens that parasitize mainly grass plants including economically important cereals like maize. Most smut pathogens cause disease symptoms only in the flowers of their host plants. An exception is Ustilago maydis, a fungus inducing ...

Protection of [Fe]-hydrogenase

November 26, 2018

Hydrogenase enzymes catalyze production and utilization of hydrogen gas, which is considered as a future energy carrier. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology in Marburg and a collaborator at the Max Planck Institute for ...

Type IV effector complexes: components of the last elusive CRISPR-Cas type

November 07, 2018

Bacteria utilize CRISPR-Cas systems to defend themselves against viral attacks. Six major CRISPR-Cas Types have been classified based on the presence of signature proteins.  Five of these six types are characterized well. Scientists of the Max Planck ...

World’s smallest chemical reactor – Built from a single protein inside bacteria

November 01, 2018

In a living cell, hundreds to thousands different chemical reactions take place in parallel. However, many chemical reactions produce reactive or toxic compounds that could harm or even kill a cell. How do organisms protect themselves against such ...

Marburger iGEM team wins competition in Boston

October 31, 2018

Students of Philipps-Universität Marburg and the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology won the international competition in the field of Synthetic Biology

Designer cells swallow up the greenhouse gas CO2

July 10, 2018

Marburg research group receives EUR 1.5 million from the Volkswagen Foundation to research new CO2 conversion methods

Events

Nicole Ludwig

A protein complex formed by Ustilago maydis effectors is essential for virulence (PhD Defense)
Dec 14, 2018 15:30
MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

Dr. Dieter Jendrossek

Organelle-like structures in Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Ralstonia eutropha
Dec 17, 2018 13:15
MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

Graduate Students Mini Symposium I/2019

Jan 7, 2019 13:15
MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

Chun-Ying Wang

Stabilizing overproduction of chemicals in E. coli through dynamic control of metabolic pathways
Jan 7, 2019 13:15
MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

Gabriele Stoffel

Mechanism of reductive carboxylation in Enoyl-CoA Carboxylases
Jan 7, 2019 13:50
MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

Simon Burgener

Oxalyl-CoA decarboxylase: breaking and making C-C bonds
Jan 7, 2019 14:25
MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall

Prof. Dr. Nick Wierckx

Minimal metabolic engineering - getting the most bang for your buck
Jan 21, 2019 13:15
MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Room: Lecture hall
Go to Editor View